MCAA

Mason Contractors’ Association of America (MCAA): This organization is composed of union and nonunion mason contractors. Its technical staff participates in technical committee meetings

IMI

International Masonry Institute (IMI): This is a union contractorcraftworker collaborative supported by dues from union masons. Its technical staff participates in technical committee meetings

ESCSI

Expanded Shale Clay and Slate Institute (ESCSI): This marketing and technical support organization is composed of producers. Its technical staff participates in technical committee meetings

NLA

National Lime Association (NLA): This marketing and technical support organization is composed of hydrated lime producers. Its technical staff participates in technical committee work

BIA

Brick Industry Association (BIA): This marketing, distributing, and technical support organization is composed of clay brick and tile producers and distributors. Its technical staff participates in technical committee work and also produces technical bulletins which can influence consensus design provisions

NCMA

National Concrete Masonry Association (NCMA): This marketing and technical support organization is composed of producers of concrete masonry units. Its technical staff participates in technical committee work and also produces technical bulletins which can influence consensus design provisions

PCA

Portland Cement Association (PCA): This marketing and technical support organization is composed of cement producers. Its technical staff participates in technical committee work

TMS

The Masonry Society (TMS): Through its technical committees, this group influences different aspects of masonry design. TMS is the lead sponsor of the Masonry Standards Joint Committee (MSJC). TMS also publishes a Masonry Designers’ Guide to accompany the MSJC design provisions

ASCE

American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE): ASCE is a joint sponsor of many ACI technical committees dealing with concrete or masonry. ASCE is the third of the three sponsoring societies of the Masonry Standards Joint Committee (MSJC). ASCE publishes ASCE 7-05 (2005), which prescribes design loadings and load factors for all structures, independent of material type

ACI

American Concrete Institute (ACI): Through its many technical committees, this group publishes a variety of design recommendations dealing with different aspects of concrete design. ACI Committee 318 develops design provisions for concrete structures. ACI is also involved with masonry, as one of the three sponsors of the Masonry Standards Joint Committee (MSJC). This committee was formed in 1978 to combine the masonry design provisions then being developed by ACI, ASCE, [&hellip

ASTM

American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM): Through its many technical committees, ASTM develops consensus specifications for materials and methods of test. Although some model code organizations use their own such specifications, most refer to ASTM specifications

How to Increase Resistance of Masonry to Water Penetration

Water penetration resistance of masonry depends on wall type, workmanship, and materials. In this section, additional information is presented on each of these. 1. Specification and design: a. Specify and design wall types appropriate for the severity of driving rain expected in the geographic location of the building. In areas of severe driving rain, specify a drainage wall or a fully grouted barrier wall with a thickness of at least [&hellip

Examples of Construction Details for Masonry Structures Requiring Little Structural Calculation

Examples of construction details for masonry structures requiring little calculation are given in the sections and figures below. These details are  generic in nature. These can be supplemented by the details provided in NCMA and BIA technical notes. 1. Overall modularity: a. Overall modularity of the CMU wythe will be satisfied provided that the interior nominal dimensions of the CMU wythe are an even number of feet, and the units have [&hellip

Design of Masonry Structures Requiring Little Structural Calculation

Design Steps for Structures Requiring Little Structural Calculation Many masonry structures require little structural calculation. Their primary design steps are layout, design involving primarily structural layout, detailing, and material specification. In this section these steps are outlined. This section can be viewed as a summary of material previously presented in Chaps. 1 and 2. 1. Layout of overall structural configuration: a. Modularity: Adjust the plan dimensions to the nominal dimensions [&hellip

Masonry Accessory Materials

Masonry accessory materials include reinforcement, connectors, sealants, flashing, coatings, and vapor barriers and moisture barriers. Each of these is described further below. Reinforcement Reinforcement consists of the following: • Steel deformed reinforcing bars meeting the requirements of ASTM A615 (billet steel) or A996 (rail and axle steel), or ASTM A706 (low-alloy weldable steel) • Joint reinforcement (ASTM A951) • Deformed reinforcing wire (ASTM A496) • Steel welded wire reinforcement for [&hellip

Properties of Masonry Assemblages

The following characteristics of masonry assemblages are covered by ASTM Specifications E72, C1072, C1388, C1389, C1390, C1391, C1357, and C1314: 1. Compressive strength: This is often denoted by fm . Using ASTM C1314, it is measured using stack-bonded prisms whose maximum ratio of height divided by least lateral dimension is between 1.3 and 5. For example: a. Hollow concrete masonry units measuring 8 × 8 × 16 in., tested as [&hellip

« Previous PageNext Page »