Category: Composite Structures

This volume provides an introduction to the theory and design of composite structures of steel and concrete. Readers are assumed to be familiar with the elastic and plastic theories for bending and shear of cross-section of beams and columns of a single material, such as structural steel, and to have some knowledge of reinforced concrete. No previous knowledge is assumed of the concept of shear connection within a member composed of concrete and structural steel, nor of the use of profiled steel sheeting in composite slabs. Shear connection is covered in depth in Chapter 2 and Appendix A, and the principal types of composite member in Chapter 3, 4 and 5. All material of a fundamental nature that is applicable to both buildings and bridges is included, plus more detailed information and a worked example related to building. Subjects mainly relevant to bridges are covered in Volume 2. These include composite plate and box girders and design for repeated loading.

Category: Composite Structures Introduction Continuous Beams And Slabs, And Beams In Frames

The definition of ‘continuous composite beam’ given in Eurocode 4: Part 1.1[12] is: A beam with three or more supports, in which the steel section is either continuous over internal supports or is jointed by full strength and rigid connections, with connections between the beam and each support such that it can be assumed that the support does not transfer

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Category: Composite Structures Fire resistance of composite beam

Fire design, based on the 1993 draft Eurocode 4: Part 1.2, ‘Structural fire design’, is introduced in Section 3.3.7, the whole of which is applicable to composite beams, as well as to slabs, except Section 3.3.7.5. Beams rarely have insulation or integrity functions, and have then to be designed only for the loadbearing function, R. The fire resistance class is normally the same

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Category: Composite Structures Prediction of fundamental natural frequency

In composite floors that need checking for vibration, damping is sufficiently low for its influence  on natural frequencies to be neglected. For free elastic vibration of a beam or one-way slab of uniform section, the fundamental natural frequency is Values for other end conditions and multi-span members are given by Wyatt. The relevant flexural rigidity is El (pre unit width, for slabs),

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Category: Composite Structures Effects of shrinkage of concrete and of temperature

In the fairly dry environment of a building, an unrestrained concrete slab could be expected to shrink by 0.03% of its length (3 mm in 10 m) or more. In a composite beam, the slab is restrained by the steel member, which exerts a tensile force on it, through the shear connectors near the free ends of the beam, so it apparent shrinkage

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Category: Composite Structures Vibration of composite floor structures

In British Standard 6472, ‘Evaluation of human exposure to vibration in buildings (1 Hz to 80 Hz)’, the performance of a floor structure is considered to be satisfactory when the probability of annoyance to users of the floor, or of complaints from then about interference with activities, is low. There can be no simple specification of the dynamic properties that would make a

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Category: Composite Structures Stresses and deflections in service

A composite beam is usually designed first for ultimate limit states. Its behaviour in service must then be checked. For a simply-supported beam, the most critical serviceability limit state is usually excessive deflection, which can govern the design where unpropped construction us used. Floor structures subjected to dynamic loading (e.g. as in a gymnasium) are also susceptible to excessive vibration (Section 3.11.3.2). Cracking of

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Category: Composite Structures Composite beams-longitudinal shear

Critical lengths and cross-sections It will be show in Section 3.7 that the bending moment at which yielding of steel first occurs in a simply-supported composite beam can be below 70% of the ultimate moment. If the bending-moment diagram is parabolic, then at ultimate load partial yielding of the steel beam can extend over more than half of the span. At the interface

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Category: Composite Structures Resistance to sagging bending

 Cross-sections in Class 1 or 2 The methods of calculation for sections in Class 1 or 2 are in principle the same as those for composite slabs, explained in Section 3.3.1, to which reference should be made. The main assumptions are as follows: the tensile strength of concrete is neglected; plane cross-sections of the structural steel and reinforced concrete parts of a

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