Tag Archive for Tag: Beam

Tag: Beam Uplift Shear Connection

In the preceding examplem the stress normal to the interface AOB (Fig.2.2) was everywhere compressive and equal to w/2b except at the ends of the beam .The stress would have been tensile if the load w had been applied to the lower member. Such loading is unlikely, except when traveling cranes are suspended from the steelwork of a composite floor above: but there

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Tag: Beam No shear connection

We assume first that there is no shear connection or friction on the interface AB. The upper beam cannot deflect more than the lower one, so each carries load w/2 per unit length as if it were an isolated beam of second moment of area bh3/12, and the vertical compressive stress across the interface is w/2b. The midspan bending moment

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Tag: Beam Design Provisions for Flexural Members

Design of flexural members requires consideration primarily of bending and shear strength, deflection, and end bearing. Strength of Flexural Members The stress induced in a beam (or other flexural member) when subjected to design loads should not exceed the strength of the member. The maximum bending stress ƒb at any section of a beam is given by the flexural formula ƒb = 

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Tag: Beam Composite Construction

In composite construction, rolled or built-up steel shapes are combined with reinforced concrete to form a structural member. Examples of this type of construction include: (a) concrete-encased steel beams (Fig. 7.37c), (b) concrete decks interactive with steel beams (Fig. 7.37a and b), (c) concrete encased steel columns, and (d) concrete filled steel columns. The most common use of this type of construction is for composite

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Tag: Beam Continuous Beams and Frames

Fixed-end beams, continuous beams, continuous trusses, and rigid frames are statically indeterminate. The equations of equilibrium are not sufficient for the deter mination of all the unknown forces and moments. Additional equations based on a knowledge of the deformation of the member are required. Hence, while the bending moments in a simply supported beam are determined only by the loads and the span, bending

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Tag: Beam Curved Beams

Structural members, such as arches, crane hooks, chain links, and frames of some machines, that have considerable initial curvature in the plane of loading are called curved beams. The flexure formula of Art. 5.5.10, ƒ = Mc/ I, cannot be applied to them with any reasonable degree of accuracy unless the depth of the beam is small compared with the radius of curvature. Unlike

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Tag: Beam Straight Beams

Beams are the horizontal members used to support vertically applied loads across an opening. In a more general sense, they are structural members that external loads tend to bend, or curve. Usually, the term beam is applied to members with top continuously connected to bottom throughout their length, and those with top and bottom connected at intervals are called trusses. See also Structural System,

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Tag: Beam Allowable-Stress Design of Bridge with Continuous, Composite Stringers

The structure is a two-lane highway bridge with overall length of 298 ft. Site conditions require a central span of 125 ft. End spans, therefore, are each 86.5 ft (Fig. 12.66a). The typical cross section in Fig. 12.66b shows a 30-ft roadway, flanked on one side by a 21-inwide barrier curb and on the other by a 6-ft-wide sidewalk. The deck is supported

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Tag: Beam Continuous-Beam Bridges

Articles 12.1 and 12.3 recommended use of continuity for multispan bridges. Advantages over simply supported spans include less weight, greater stiffness, smaller deflections, and fewer bearings and expansion joints. Disadvantages include more complex fabrication and erection and often the costs of additional field splices. Continuous structures also offer greater overload capacity. Failure does not necessarily occur if overloads cause yielding at one point in

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Tag: Beam Characteristics of Beam Bridges

Rolled wide-flange shapes generally are the most economical type of construction for shortspan bridges. The beams usually are used as stringers, set, at regular intervals, parallel to the direction of traffic, between piers or abutments (Fig. 12.1). A concrete deck, cast on the top flange, provides lateral support against buckling. Diaphragms between the beams offer additional bracing and also distribute loads laterally to the

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