Tag Archive for Tag: Bearing Capacity

Tag: Bearing Capacity Bearing Capacity of Rocks

Bearing capacities of rocks are often determined by crushing a core sample in a testing machine. Samples used for testing must be free from cracks and defects. In the rock formation where bedding planes, joints and other planes of weakness exist, the practice that is normally followed is to classify the rock according to RQD (Rock Quality Designation). Table 9.2

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Tag: Bearing Capacity Bearing Capacity of Foundations on Top of a Slope

There are occasions where structures are required to be built on slopes or near the edges of slopes. Since full formations of shear zones under ultimate loading conditions are not possible on the sides close to the slopes or edges, the supporting capacity of soil on that side get considerably reduced. Meyerhof (1957) extended his theories to include the effect

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Tag: Bearing Capacity Bearing Capacity of Foundations Subjected to Eccentric Loads

Foundations Subjected to Eccentric Vertical Loads If a foundation is subjected to lateral loads and moments in addition to vertical loads, eccentricity in loading results. The point of application of the resultant of all the loads would lie outside the geometric center of the foundation, resulting in eccentricity in loading. The eccentricity e is measured from the center of the

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Tag: Bearing Capacity Effect of Soil Compressibility on Bearing Capacity of Soil

Terzaghi (1943) developed Eq. (12.6) based on the assumption that the soil is incompressible. In order to take into account the compressibility of soil, he proposed reduced strength characteristics c and 0 defined by Eq. (12.11). As per Vesic (1973) a flat reduction of 0 in the case of local and  punching shear failures is too conservative and ignores the existence of

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Tag: Bearing Capacity General Bearing Capacity Equation

The bearing capacity Eq. (12.6) developed by Terzaghi is for a strip footing under general shear failure. Eq. (12.6) has been modified for other types of foundations such as square, circular and rectangular by introducing shape factors. Meyerhof (1963) presented a general bearing capacity equation which takes into account the shape and the inclination of load. The general form of

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Tag: Bearing Capacity Bearing capacity problem example 7

A rectangular footing of size 10 x 20 ft is founded at a depth of 6 ft below the ground level in a cohesive soil (0 = 0) which fails by general shear. Given: ysal =114 lb/ft3, c = 945 lb/ft2. The water table is close to the ground surface. Determine q , q and qna by (a) Terzaghi’s method,

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Tag: Bearing Capacity Bearing capacity problem example 6

A rectangular footing of size 10 x 20 ft is founded at a depth of 6 ft below the ground surface in a homogeneous cohesionless soil having an angle of shearing resistance 0 = 35°. The water table is at a great depth. The unit weight of soil 7= 114 lb/ft3. Determine: (1) the net ultimate bearing capacity, (2) the

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Tag: Bearing Capacity Bearing capacity problem example 5

A square footing fails by general shear in a cohesionless soil under an ultimate load of Qult – 1687.5 kips. The footing is placed at a depth of 6.5 ft below ground level. Given 0 = 35°, and 7=110 Ib/ft3, determine the size of the footing if the water table is at a great depth (Fig. Ex. 5). Solution For a square

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Tag: Bearing Capacity Bearing capacity problem example 4

If the water table in Ex. 1  occupies any of the positions (a) 1.25 m below ground level or (b) 1.25 m below the base level of the foundation, what will be the net safe bearing pressure? Assume ysat = 18.5 kN/m3, /(above WT) = 17.5 kN/m3. All the other data remain the same as given in Ex. 1 Solution Method 1—By making

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Tag: Bearing Capacity Bearing capacity problem example 3

If the water table in Ex. 1 rises to the ground level, determine the net safe bearing pressure of the footing. All the other data given in Ex. 12.1 remain the same. Assume the saturated unit weight of the soil ysat= 18.5 kN/m3. Solution When the WT is at ground level we have to use the submerged unit weight of the soil.

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