Tag Archive for Tag: Bending

Tag: Bending Stresses and deflections in service

A composite beam is usually designed first for ultimate limit states. Its behaviour in service must then be checked. For a simply-supported beam, the most critical serviceability limit state is usually excessive deflection, which can govern the design where unpropped construction us used. Floor structures subjected to dynamic loading (e.g. as in a gymnasium) are also susceptible to excessive vibration (Section 3.11.3.2). Cracking of

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Tag: Bending Resistance to sagging bending

 Cross-sections in Class 1 or 2 The methods of calculation for sections in Class 1 or 2 are in principle the same as those for composite slabs, explained in Section 3.3.1, to which reference should be made. The main assumptions are as follows: the tensile strength of concrete is neglected; plane cross-sections of the structural steel and reinforced concrete parts of a

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Tag: Bending Resistance of composite slabs to sagging bending

The width of slab considered in calculations, b, is usually taken as one metre, but for clarity only a width of one wavelength is shown in Fig.3.2. The overall thickness hs is required by Eurocode 4 to be not less than 80 mm; and the thickness of concrete above the ‘main flat surface’ of the top of the ribs of the sheeting, to

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Tag: Bending Introduction to Shear Connection

The established design methods for reinforced concrete and for structural steel give no help with the basic problem of connecting steel to the concrete. The force applied to this connection is mainly, but not entirely, longitudinal shear. As with bolted and welded joints, the connection is a region of severe and complex stress that defies accurate analysis, and so methods

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Tag: Bending Combined Bending and Axial Loading

When a bending moment and an axial force act on a section of a structural member, the effects of the combined stresses must be provided for in design of the member. Bending and Axial Tension Members subjected to combined bending and axial tension should be proportioned to satisfy the interaction equations, Eqs. (10.26) and (10.27). Adjustment factors are discussed in

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Tag: Bending Thin-Shell Structures

A structural membrane or shell is a curved surface structure. Usually, it is capable of transmitting loads in more than two directions to supports. It is highly efficient structurally when it is so shaped, proportioned, and supported that it transmits the loads without bending or twisting. A membrane or a shell is defined by its middle surface, halfway between its extrados, or outer surface

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Tag: Bending Members Stressed Primarily in Bending

Rolled beams and fabricated girder spans provide economical bridges for railways. Laying out the lateral bracing system and diaphragms or cross frames is the first step in the design procedure. Some of the requirements for the bracing have grown out of railroad bridge experience, including some fatigue failures that required changes in previously acceptable practices. Lateral Bracing A system of bottom lateral bracing should

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Tag: Bending Combined Tensile Axial Load and Bending

Members under combined axial tensile load and bending must satisfy the interaction equations given by the AISI Specification to prevent yielding. Separate equations are given for ASD and LRFD but symbols have common definitions except as noted. ASD Method. To check the tension flange

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Tag: Bending Combined Bending and Tension

For combined axial tension and bending, the AISC LRFD specification stipulates that members should be proportioned to satisfy the same interaction equations as for axial compression and bending, Eqs. (6.65) and (6.66), Art. 6.19.1, but with

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Tag: Bending Combined Bending and Compression

Design of a structural member for loading that induces both bending and axial compression should take into account not only the primary stresses due to the combined loading but also secondary effects. Commonly called P-delta effects, these result from two sources: (1) Incremental bending moments caused by buckling of the member that create eccentricity of the axial compression load with respect to the neutral axis,

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