Tag Archive for Tag: contractor

Tag: contractor Construction manager

The owner may engage a construction manager to provide professional construction management services. The construction manager organisation provides advice to the owner regarding construction matters, including cost, schedule, safety, the construction process and other considerations; such advice may be offered throughout the project life cycle or at selected portions thereof. Two types of construction management have evolved (Rubin et al.,

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Tag: contractor Handling and fixing steel reinforcement

In best engineering practice the engineer will produce complete bar-bending schedules for use by the contractor. The engineer may not guarantee that such schedules are error free and may call upon the contractor to check them. But, as often as not, the contractor will fail to do this, so it is advisable for the resident engineer to check the schedules so that he can

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Tag: contractor Site roads

A contractor who pays insufficient attention to the right construction of site haulage roads runs the risk the road will begin to break up and cause delay just at some crucial time of construction, such as when autumn rains begin and the contractor is hoping to get filling finished before the heavier rainfall of winter occurs and delays construction. Pushing hardcore into the worst

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Tag: contractor Placing and compacting fill

When the contractor assesses the amount of filling he will need to transport to achieve a given earthwork construction, he has to allow for: • fill after compaction occupying more, or less, volume than it does in the borrowpit; • settlement of the formation under the weight of new fill as placed; • further compression of the fill after placement under the

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Tag: contractor Haulage of excavated material

For large open excavations, such as when road cuttings have to be made and the material tipped to form embankments, or for building an earth dam from open borrow pit areas, the motorscraper is the most economical machine for excavating, transporting and placing clays and clay-sand mixes. But the gradients traversed need to be gentle and the motorscraper cannot pick up hard bands of material

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Tag: contractor Controlling excavation

The base of an excavation has usually to be trimmed level and cleared of disturbed or loose material so that it forms a solid base for concrete foundations, pipes or earthworks, etc. Specifications often call for the last 100 mm of excavation to be ‘carried out by hand’ – a costly procedure for the contractor which he usually seeks to avoid. The resident engineer

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Tag: contractor Variations proposed by the contractor

The contractor normally has no right to vary the works and the terms of the contract will specifically preclude this. But he can make suggestions as to how the work might be varied, for his own benefit or the benefit of the employer or both. He has no power to adopt his own suggestion; but if, say, he is unable to purchase an item

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Tag: contractor Price adjustment

Some contracts contain a price variation clause in order to protect the contractor against the risk of rising prices due to inflation. Nowadays it is not usual for contracts in the UK lasting less than 2 years to contain such a clause. To calculate the amount due, the contractor either has to produce evidence of how prices have altered since he submitted his

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Tag: contractor Payment of lump sums, method related items and any adjustment item

Unless there is some stipulation that a lump sum is to be paid in stages it only becomes payable when the whole of the work itemized under the lump sum is completed. However, fairness has to be applied when an item combines two operations and nothing is stipulated about staged payment. Occasionally a lump sum item reads: ‘Provide and set up engineer’s offices as

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Tag: contractor Agreeing quantities for payment

The way in which the resident engineer should measure quantities has already been described in Section 13.6. In that section the importance was emphasized of making clear what has been measured, and what has been agreed for payment – with sketches as necessary. It is strongly advisable that the resident engineer should take the lead in assessing final quantities. He or a member of

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