Tag Archive for Tag: Strength Design

Tag: Strength Design Example of Strength Design of Reinforced Clay Masonry Shear Wall

Consider the masonry shear wall shown in Fig. 6.26. Design the wall. Unfactored in-plane lateral loads at each floor level are due to earthquake, and are shown in Fig. 6.27, along with the corresponding shear and moment diagrams. Assume an 8-in. nominal clay masonry wall, grouted solid, with Type S PCL mortar. The total plan length of the wall is

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Tag: Strength Design Strength Design of Reinforced Shear Walls

Introduction to Strength Design of Reinforced Shear Walls In this section, we shall study the behavior and design of reinforced masonry shear walls. The discussion follows the same approach used previously for unreinforced masonry shear walls. Design Steps for Strength Design of Reinforced Shear Walls Reinforced masonry shear walls must be designed for the effects of: 1. Gravity loads from

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Tag: Strength Design Example of Strength Design of Masonry Walls Loaded Out-of-Plane

Once we have developed the moment-axial force interaction diagram by the strength approach, the actual design simply consists of verifying that the combination of factored design axial force and moment lies within the diagram of nominal axial and flexural capacity, reduced by strengthreduction factors. Consider the bearing wall designed previously as unreinforced, shown in Fig. 6.19. It has an eccentric

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Tag: Strength Design Introduction to Strength Design of Reinforced Bearing Walls

In this section, we shall study the behavior and design of reinforced masonry wall elements subjected to combinations of axial force and outof- plane flexure. In the context of engineering mechanics, they are beamcolumns. In the context of the MSJC Code, however, a “column” is an isolated masonry element rarely found in real masonry construction. Masonry beam-columns, like those of

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Tag: Strength Design Example of Strength Design of a Reinforced Curtain Wall

A curtain wall of standard modular clay units spans 20 ft between columns, and is simply supported at each column. It has reinforcement consisting of W4.9 wire each face, every course. The curtain wall is subjected to a wind pressure w = 20 lb/ft2. Design the curtain wall. As an initial assumption, use fm′ = 2,500 lb/in.2. Referring to Table

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Tag: Strength Design Steps in Strength Design of Reinforced Beams and Lintels

The most common reinforced masonry beam is a lintel. Lintels are beams that support masonry over openings. Strength design of reinforced beams and lintels follows the steps given below: 1. Shear design a. Calculate the design shear, and compare it with the corresponding resistance. Revise the lintel depth if necessary. 2. Flexural design a. Calculate the design moment. b. Calculate

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Tag: Strength Design Strength Design of Reinforced Beams and Lintels

Strength design of reinforced masonry beams follows the same steps used for reinforced concrete beams. The basic assumptions are shown in Fig. 6.1. Strain in the masonry is assumed to have a maximum useful value of 0.0025 for concrete masonry and 0.0035 for clay masonry. Tension reinforcement is assumed to be somewhere on the yield plateau. Because axial load is

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Tag: Strength Design Strength Design of Anchor Bolts

In masonry construction, anchor bolts are most commonly used to anchor roof or floor diaphragms to masonry walls. As shown in Fig. 5.26, vertically oriented anchor bolts can be placed along the top of a masonry wall to anchor a roof diaphragm resting on the top of the wall. Alternatively, horizontally oriented anchor bolts can be placed along the face

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Tag: Strength Design Strength Design for Flexure

Article 9.44 summarizes the basic assumptions for strength design of flexural members. The following formulas are derived from those assumptions. The area As of tension reinforcement in a reinforced-concrete flexural member can be expressed as the ratio where b = beam width and d = effective beam depth  distance from the extreme compression surface to centroid of tension reinforcement. At

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