Tag Archive for Tag: Tension Members

Tag: Tension Members Stress and Strain

Structural capacity, or ultimate strength, is that property of a structural member that serves as a measure of is ability to support all potential loads without severe cracking or excessive deformations. To indicate when the limit on load-carrying usefulness has been reached, design specifications for the various structural materials establish allowable unit stresses or design strengths that may not be exceeded under  maximum loading.

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Tag: Tension Members Truss Member Details

The following shapes for truss members are typically considered: H sections, made with two side segments (composed of angles or plates) with solid web, perforated web, or web of stay plates and lacing. Modern bridges almost exclusively use H sections made of three plates welded together. Channel sections, made with two angle segments, with solid  , perforated web, or web of

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Tag: Tension Members Criteria for Built-Up Tension Members

A tension member and all its components must be proportioned to meet the requirements for maximum slenderness ratio given in Table 11.24. The member also must be designed to ensure that the allowable tensile stress on the net section is not exceeded. The net section of a high-strength-bolted tension member is the sum of the net sections of its components. The net section

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Tag: Tension Members Built-Up Tension Members

The design strength and allowable stresses for prismatic built-up members subjected to axial tension by static forces are the same as for tension members given in Art. 6.13. Components of a built-up tension member should be connected at frequent intervals to ensure that they act together, that faying surfaces intended to be in contact stay in contact, that excessive vibration

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Tag: Tension Members Built-Up Compression Members

Design of built-up compression members should comply with the basic requirement for prevention of local and overall buckling of compression members as summarized in Arts. 6.16 and 6.23. To ensure, however, that individual components, such as plates and shapes, of a built-up member act together, the AISC ASD and LRFD specifications for structural steel buildings emphasize proper interconnection of the components. Many of the

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Tag: Tension Members Relative Cost of Structural Steels

Because of the many strength levels and grades now available, designers usually must investigate several steels to determine the most economical one for each application. As a guide, relative material costs of several structural steels used as tension members, beams, and columns are discussed below. The comparisons are based on cost of steel to fabricators (steel producer’s price) because, in

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